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Heritage Craft Ready to Ship

Guatemala Collection 4

$140.00 Regular price
Unit price
per 

This handwoven throw pillow showcases a traditional Mayan design, crafted by artisans in the Guatemalan highlands. It offers a captivating representation of ancient stories, leaving a lasting impression on any viewer. Add a touch of culture and heritage to your home with this beautiful and meaningful product. Learn more in the details below.

Learn more including dimensions, region, material the Product details section below.

*Pillow insert not included. 

Heritage Craft Ready to Ship

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Origin 1
Process 2
Product details 3
Pixan is an Indigenous and women owned fair trade textile workshop located in the western Highlands of Guatemala. Pixan, which means “spirit” in the Maya language of K’iche, is an association of Indigenous artisan weavers who pass down the ancient art of backstrap and pedal loom weaving and embroidery. Pixan is one of the social enterprise initiatives of the Asociación de Mujeres del Altiplano (AMA) or Association of Highland Women, which further partners with the Highland Support Project, both of which are dedicated to improving the conditions of Indigenous women in Guatemala. AMA, which calls itself a “group of housewives, weavers, midwives, health workers and professionals who have joined forces to improve our communities,” has its roots in 1960s Guatemala, when armed conflict in the country left many women with limited economic opportunities. Although Pixan’s techniques, fabrics, and patterns are crafted by weavers who create motifs that have been passed down for generations, the collective is not afraid to break a few rules. Pixan weavers often create designs from the landscapes and mountains that surround their homelands. Ancestrally, fabrics woven on a foot loom were only crafted by men due to the strength required to operate the loom. Pixan, however, believes women are strong and capable and have trained women to become master foot loom weavers. Pixan has donated more than 8 wooden foot looms to the Mam & K'iche communities. The Pixan model champions fair pay and working conditions, high-quality artisanal work, and direct trade relationships, which removes the need for middlemen and their fees.
Pixan is an Indigenous and women owned fair trade textile workshop located in the western Highlands of Guatemala. Pixan, which means “spirit” in the Maya language of K’iche, is an association of Indigenous artisan weavers who pass down the ancient art of backstrap and pedal loom weaving and embroidery. Pixan is one of the social enterprise initiatives of the Asociación de Mujeres del Altiplano (AMA) or Association of Highland Women, which further partners with the Highland Support Project, both of which are dedicated to improving the conditions of Indigenous women in Guatemala. AMA, which calls itself a “group of housewives, weavers, midwives, health workers and professionals who have joined forces to improve our communities,” has its roots in 1960s Guatemala, when armed conflict in the country left many women with limited economic opportunities. Although Pixan’s techniques, fabrics, and patterns are crafted by weavers who create motifs that have been passed down for generations, the collective is not afraid to break a few rules. Pixan weavers often create designs from the landscapes and mountains that surround their homelands. Ancestrally, fabrics woven on a foot loom were only crafted by men due to the strength required to operate the loom. Pixan, however, believes women are strong and capable and have trained women to become master foot loom weavers. Pixan has donated more than 8 wooden foot looms to the Mam & K'iche communities. The Pixan model champions fair pay and working conditions, high-quality artisanal work, and direct trade relationships, which removes the need for middlemen and their fees.
Origin 1
Process 2
Product details 3
Backstrap weaving is a centuries-old art form that is still practiced among the local women weavers in rural villages across Guatemala. Legendary stories suggest that the Mayan communities first learned to weave thousands of years ago by Ix Chel, the Mayan Goddess of the Moon. Mayan tales are threaded into each colorful design, weaving together unique patterns that tell a story.
Backstrap weaving is a centuries-old art form that is still practiced among the local women weavers in rural villages across Guatemala. Legendary stories suggest that the Mayan communities first learned to weave thousands of years ago by Ix Chel, the Mayan Goddess of the Moon. Mayan tales are threaded into each colorful design, weaving together unique patterns that tell a story.
Origin 1
Process 2
Product details 3
care
Spot clean with cold water and soap
dimensions
16"x16"
material
100% Cotton
process
Handwoven on a traditional backstrap loom
region
Highlands of Guatemala
Shipping & returns
30 Day Free Returns
Stock & Lead Time
In stock and ready to ship. Once sold out, custom orders can be requested.
More Information
For custom inquiries, please contact info@knith.co
Handmade Disclaimer
Please be advised that as each of our products is expertly handmade by skilled artisans, there may be slight variations in color, texture, and size from one item to another. These subtle differences are a testament to the authenticity and uniqueness of our products, and we firmly believe that they contribute to the beauty and character of each piece. Our artisan partners take pride in their craftsmanship and strive to ensure that each item is of the highest quality. Please rest assured that we stand behind the quality of our products. We appreciate your understanding and hope that you will cherish the individuality of your piece.